Fitness Trackers vs. Smartphones: Why Wearables Win

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Subscribe for more: | Brent Rose debunks a study claiming smartphones are as good as wearables at tracking activity. From the Fitbit Charge HR to the iPhone 6, Brent’s stress tests uncover compelling results that demonstrate why wearables with heart rate monitors win.

More in his article:

Tech writer Brent Rose is on a quest. With a surplus of emerging technologies and scientific discoveries popping up how do we separate facts from hype? Brent takes the goods out of the box—and out of the office—to find out how the new wave of cultural phenomena really holds up.

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Fitness Trackers vs. Smartphones: Why Wearables Win

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47 thoughts on “Fitness Trackers vs. Smartphones: Why Wearables Win”

  1. phones do detect cycling even when ur stationary on machine…I have tested this out using Google fit

  2. I have Fitbit charge HR as well as Garmin Finix3 HR. both works well and accurate. In the video, it is clear that you are promoting only Fitbit and promoting Garmin. it seems that you are not familiar with the finix3. why you are misleading people. you did not show the count on the video. how do we know that you are not lying? its only a marking thing what you did in the video.

  3. I own a garmin forerunner 630 and if you wear the hr monitor that comes with it it is by far more accurate than only other fitness tracker

  4. Referring to https://www.wired.com/2016/11/gopro-karma-vs-dji-mavic-pro/

    I am warning all reader about trusting Brent Rose and Wired review on any product and tech unless strong and urgent corrective action is taken. Follows is my suggestion to Wired.

    Wired,

    You are absolutely correct to say wrong is wrong and let it pass if the wrong is unintentional. However, if someone intentionally published bias review because he was too lazy to do his homework, stand to gain personally or simply just downright illogical; then, such wrong should never be taken lightly by a major media outlet. Publicly denouce and cutting all ties with Brent Rose for his action seems to be the only decent you are required to do and here is why.

    The reason why I stated his action is intentional is because the review by Wired is published almost 2 weeks after Mavic launch as such that is a lot of other reviews which Brent should have gone through before writing such a late review. In addition, he intentionally limit his comparison perimeter to put Karma in the best possible light. Thus, he is either intentionally crazy, intentionally lazy, intentionally bribed or their combinations.

    Without any strong and immediate disciplinary action, his values will be seems to reflect the media value. i.e. Wired is a corrupted media source, where its contributors and authors are too lazy to do basic research before review and no one should take it seriously.

    You decide!

    VTC Drone

  5. i still think these are unnecessary for fitness, additional technology only to satisfy the belief in fitness rather than being active

  6. All the comments suggesting using a heart rate monitor strap. My phone can connect with several different versions. If you are going to wear a strap, it makes a phone more accurate as well. Only down side is their weight and bulk, especially the plus type phones…

  7. But, in a way, you will not buy a Fenix 3 / HR / 5 for activity tracker functionality! You can, but others products will performe the same, are cheaper, and can fit the requirement. Buy a Fenix if you want a good indestructible multi sport tracker, mainly outdoor, in this specific domain, it rock!

  8. This info is useful (ish) if you want to know how much you burn during normal life. For me I only care about tracking when I'm working out, and for that I feel like they would all do equally well since all I'm after is hr, distance, pace and time. I feel like the estimate for day-to-day activities is kinda useless data, do you really weigh how many calories you burned vs intake every time you eat? I feel like you should just listen to your body, if you're always tired, might need to eat some more and stuff like that. Just some food for thought

  9. Well at the end you still didn't tell us how much calories you actually burned you just showed us that the fitness trackers with the heart rate monitor showed more calories burned but they still could be overcounting or undercounting your actual calories burned so we still don't know if the weareble devices can be trusted on their information or not.

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